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Marva Moxey-Mims, M.D.

Professor of Pediatrics, George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences Division Chief of Nephrology, Children’s National Health System

Email: mmoxeymims@childrensnational.org

Dr. Marva Moxey-Mims is Chief of the Division of Nephrology at Children’s National Health System, Washington, D.C. She was previously at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. There, she served as Deputy Director for clinical science in the Division of Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases, overseeing a portfolio of research including trials for kidney disease and genitourinary dysfunction in adults and children, and as Director of the Pediatric Nephrology program. In addition, she managed the division’s small business grants for kidney research. Two of the studies she initiated are the ongoing Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) study, the largest study of pediatric chronic kidney disease ever conducted in North America, and the Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR) trial, a large trial undertaken to understand the effectiveness of prophylactic antimicrobial treatment in children with vesicoureteral reflux.

Dr. Moxey-Mims’ focus at Children’s is clinical research to improve the care of children with kidney disease and to be used as a tool to educate trainees. She received her undergraduate degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, and her medical degree from Howard University in Washington, D.C. She completed her pediatric residency and clinical pediatric nephrology training at Children’s National, followed by a research fellowship at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the NIH. She is board-certified in pediatrics and pediatric nephrology, and is a member of several national committees.

Selected Publications
Braden GL, Chapman A, Ellison DH, et al. Advancing Nephrology: Division Leaders Advise ASN [published online ahead of print, 2020 Aug 12]. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2020;CJN.01550220. doi:10.2215/CJN.01550220

Troost JP, Trachtman H, Spino C, et al. Proteinuria Reduction and Kidney Survival in Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis [published online ahead of print, 2020 Jul 23]. Am J Kidney Dis. 2020;S0272-6386(20)30846-5. doi:10.1053/j.ajkd.2020.04.014

Hanson CS, Craig JC, Logeman C, et al. Establishing core outcome domains in pediatric kidney disease: report of the Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Children and Adolescents (SONG-KIDS) consensus workshops. Kidney Int. 2020;98(3):553-565. doi:10.1016/j.kint.2020.05.054

Bjornstad P, Nehus E, Jenkins T, et al. Five-year kidney outcomes of bariatric surgery differ in severely obese adolescents and adults with and without type 2 diabetes. Kidney Int. 2020;97(5):995-1005. doi:10.1016/j.kint.2020.01.016

Freedman BI, Moxey-Mims MM, Alexander AA, et al. APOL1 Long-term Kidney Transplantation Outcomes Network (APOLLO): Design and Rationale. Kidney Int Rep. 2019;5(3):278-288. Published 2019 Dec 13. doi:10.1016/j.ekir.2019.11.022

Nadkarni MD, Mattoo TK, Gravens-Mueller L, et al. Laboratory Findings After Urinary Tract Infection and Antimicrobial Prophylaxis in Children With Vesicoureteral Reflux. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2020;59(3):259-265. doi:10.1177/0009922819898185

Anand S, Caplin B, Gonzalez-Quiroz M, et al. Epidemiology, molecular, and genetic methodologies to evaluate causes of CKDu around the world: report of the Working Group from the ISN International Consortium of Collaborators on CKDu. Kidney Int. 2019;96(6):1254-1260. doi:10.1016/j.kint.2019.09.019

Sgambat K, Ahn SY, Moxey-Mims M. Editorial: Nutrition and Growth in Children With Chronic Kidney Disease. Front Pediatr. 2019;7:402. Published 2019 Oct 1. doi:10.3389/fped.2019.00402

Kimmel PL, Fwu CW, Abbott KC, et al. Psychiatric Illness and Mortality in Hospitalized ESKD Dialysis Patients. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2019;14(9):1363-1371. doi:10.2215/CJN.14191218

Ahn SY, Moxey-Mims M. CKD in Children: The Importance of a National Epidemiologic Study. Am J Kidney Dis. 2018;72(5):628-630. doi:10.1053/j.ajkd.2018.07.005

George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences | Children’s National Health System

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